Monday, April 7, 2008

Worst Look of the Day - Nothing we didn't already know



Was all of this really necessary?

6 months and 278 witnesses later, a British inquest has decided that Princess Diana's death was caused by a combination of her chauffeur's negligence and the dangerous pursuit given by paparazzi on that fateful night.

The findings were shockingly similar to the findings from a 2006 British police inquiry.

I understand that many out there find solace in the conspiracies that have fashioned to "explain" Diana's death. Their behavior is in some ways similar to the behavior of Tupac loyalists who refuse to accept that he is dead or believe that there was some high-level covert operation that brought about the rapper's demise.

I can vividly recall hearing news reports of Princess Diana's death. At the age of 12, I didn't even know who she was. But the immediate outpour of grief the world over gave me a clue as to how important the Princess was. I was overcome with sadness, not unlike most people that caught wind of the news. The Brits had lost a cultural icon of extreme superstar status. So contagious was her likability that I, like many other Americans, awakened in the middle of an American night to watch one of the saddest English mornings of them all.

Yet, despite all of the disbelief and initial speculating done, I knew that the cause of the Princess' death was far too simple to justify her premature departure. Many felt that there had to be some better explanation. There had to be some level of culpability to be borne by an individual or agency that could be punished for its actions.

This mythical villain has yet to emerge. Instead, we continue to find ourselves stuck with the same questions. Why her? Why so soon? How could simple carelessness lead to the untimely end of a woman that was larger than life?

There answers may never come. Hopefully, this most recent ruling will close the chapter on these painful exercises that invoke much sadness without drawing any satisfying conclusions.

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